Manchester Self-Harm Project (MaSH)

The Manchester Self-Harm Project (MaSH) was founded in 1997. MaSH is a leading UK centre for the study of self-harm and suicidal behaviour.

The MaSH Project forms a part of the Department of Health funded Multicentre Study of Self-Harm in England.

News and Information

** May 2016** Seeking clinician's views on mental capacity, advance decisions, and suicidal behaviour

NIHR Programme Grant Project launches a national clinician survey on mental capacity, advance decisions, and suicidal behaviour. For more information, click here.

 

**April 2016** Epidemiology and trends in non-fatal self-harm in three centres in England, 2000-2012: findings from the Multicentre Study of Self-harm in England

Self-harm is a major health problem in many countries, with potential adverse outcomes including suicide and other causes of premature death. It is important to monitor national trends in this behaviour. We examined trends in non-fatal self-harm and its management in England during the 13-year period, 2000–2012. Our research has been published in the BMJ open and can be viewed at DOI:10.1136/bmjopen-2015-010538.
 
 
 

**April 2016** The MaSH Newsletter for Winter/Spring 2016

Our regular newsletters let you know what work MaSH has been doing recently and summarises some of our recently published papers.  It can be viewed by clicking here.  If you would like to subscribe to our half-yearly newsletters then please email us at: mash@manchester.ac.uk.

 

 

**February 2016** Rates of self-harm presenting to general hospitals: a comparison of data from the Multicentre Study of Self-Harm in England and Hospital Episode Statistics

Rates of hospital presentation for self-harm in England were compared using different national and local data sources. The findings have been published in BMJ open and can be read by clicking on DOI:10.1136/bmjopen-2015-009749

 

**February 2016**  Impact of the recent recession on self-harm: Longitudinal ecological and patient-level investigation from the Multicentre Study of Self-harm in England
Economic recessions are associated with increases in suicide rates but there is little information for non-fatal self-harm.  Our findings have been published in the Journal of affective disorders ans can be read at DOI:10.1016/j.jad.2015.11.001.
 
 
**February 2016**  Which are the most useful scales for predicting repeat self-harm? A systematic review evaluating risk scales using measures of diagnostic accuracy
The aims of this review were to calculate the diagnostic accuracy statistics of risk scales following self-harm and consider which might be the most useful scales in clinical practice. Our findings have been published in the BMJ open and can be viewed at DOI:10.1136/bmjopen-2015-009297.
 
 
**January 2016**  The exacerbating influence of hopelessness on other known risk factors for repeat self-harm and suicide
Hopelessness is frequently observed in people who harm themselves and is an established risk factor for nonfatal self-harm repetition and suicide. Little is known about how the presence of hopelessness in addition to other risk factors affects subsequent risk.  Our findings have been published in the Journal of affective disorders and can be viewed at DOI:10.1016/j.jad.2015.09.050.
 

Aims

The aims of the Manchester Self-Harm Project are:

  • To monitor patterns of self-harm locally
  • To evaluate self-harm services
  • To provide the evidence on which service development and training may be based
  • To provide an infrastructure for further research on patterns of self-harm and their clinical management
  • To inform and make recommendations on national suicide prevention initiatives

Purpose

The purpose of the Manchester Self-Harm Project is to inform local services about self-harm patients and contribute to national research.

We disseminate our findings at national and international conferences, in peer reviewed journals and locally to service providers.

Locally, MaSH data is presented at clinical audit meetings, research and development forums and in the training of staff and medical students.

MaSH Reports

Our biennial reports provide updates on numbers and trends of self-harm presentations to Emergency Departments in Manchester.

This data is collected in collaboration with the Manchester Mental Health and Social Care Trust and Emergency Departments at Manchester Royal Infirmary (part of Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust), North Manchester General Hospital (part of Pennine Acute Hospitals NHS Trust) and Wythenshawe Hospital (part of University Hospital of South Manchester NHS Foundation Trust).

Multi-Centre and other Reports

Research Papers

Our latest findings include research into the impact of the recent recession on self-harm; a systematic review evaluating risk scales using measures of diagnostic accuracy; and the exacerbating influence of hopelessness on other known risk factors for repeat self-harm and suicide.

We disseminate our research findings in peer reviewed journals. 

Visit our publications page for a full list of our Publications going back to our foundation in 1997.

Seminars and Conferences

We disseminate our findings at national and international conferences and locally to service providers at clinical audit meetings, research and development forums and in the presentations to staff and medical students.

Structure

The Manchester Self-Harm Studies operate from the Centre for Mental Health and Risk at the University of Manchester. The Manchester Self-Harm Project is a particpant in the Multi-Centre Study of Self-harm in England alongside other centres of excellence in Oxford and Derby.