News archive: 2016

 

December

  • Dr Chris Keyworth presented his research at the UK Society for Behavioural Medicine conference.

November

  • Dr Debbie Smith, Dr Elaine Cameron, Dr Tracy Epton, Dr Kiera Bartlett, Dr Fiona Ulph, Professor Alison Wearden, Katie Coppack, Natalie Cotterell, Nia Coupe, Faye Johnson, Steph Lyons, Aliya Ismangil, Christina Sotiropoulou-Drosopo, Olivia Dodding, Rachael Hewitt and Julia Mueller introduced the public to hands on activities based around health psychology in the Help yourself by healthy public event at Whitworth gallery.
  • Dr Tracy Epton presented her research at the World Cancer Congress in Paris.

October

  • Professor Chris Armitage and Dr Maddie Arden (Sheffield Hallam University), found that a brief intervention added to wine bottles reduced alcohol consumption at follow up. This was published in the journal British Journal of Psychology.
  • Dr Debbie Smith, Professor Alison Wearden, Dr Elaine Cameron, Dr Kiera Bartlett, and Eleanor Bull introduced visitors to health psychology at the European Researchers night Science Uncovered Event at Manchester Museum.
  • Dr Rachael Powell, Professor Alison Wearden and colleagues published their review on understanding hte low uptake of bone anchored hearing aids published in Journal of Laryngology and Otology.

September

  • Dr Kiera Bartlett, presented research at MAHSC Cancer Prevention and Early Detection Showcase , conducted by a team at MCHP about the methods they used to characterise smokers who are not planning to quit smoking.
  • Dr Tracy Epton, Dr Elaine Cameron, Emma Brown, Mei Yee-Tang, Dr Nicola Gartland, Angela Devereux-Fitzgerald, Dr Kim Dienes, Professor Alison Wearden, Professor David French and Dr Rachael Powell attended and presented their research at the Division of Health Psychology / European Health Psychology conference in Aberdeen, Uk.
  • Dr Tracy Epton and Dr Chris Keyworth joined Professor Chris Armitage and Professor Rachel Callam to work on a project about Obesity prevention funded by TESCO.
  • Dr Joanna Goldthorpe and colleagues published their research on a self help intervention to manage chronic orofacial pain in the Journal of Oral and Facial Pain and Headache.

August

  • Dr Kiera Bartlett, and the team at MCHP published an article about the experiences of smokers who are not planning to quit smoking. The article is published in BMC Public Health.
  • Donna Littlewood and colleagues published their study regarding the role of sleep in suicide risk in BMJ Open.

July

  • Professor David French was part of a large team that published recommendations about a brief psychological intervention that involves making "if-then" plans to change behaviour. This was published in Psychology & Health.
  • Dr Elaine Cameron and Professor David French published their research regarding the importance of hangover symptoms in the perceived safety to drive the morning after drinking. This was published in Drug and Alcohol Review.

June

  • Angela Devereux-Fitzgerald, Rachael Powell, Ann Dewhurst and Professor David French published a review to discuss how acceptable older adults found the physical activity interventions. This was published in Social Science and Medicine.

May

  • Dr Joanana Goldthorpe and colleagues published their work around the acceptability of an intervention to manage chronic orafacial pain in the British Dental Journal.
  • Dr Rachael Powell published her review regarding psychological preparation and post-operative outcomes for adults undergoing general anaesthesia published in the Cochrane Database.

April

  • Dr Elaine Cameron and Professor David French started a project funded by the Multiple Sclerosis Society to conduct a national study about the factors influencing prescribing of MS drugs.

March

  • Dr Kiera Bartlett, presented research at the Society of Behavioural Medicine in Washington DC , about using technology to engage smokers who are not ready to quit.

February

  • Professor Chris Armitage, had a paper published in Quality of Life Research. The paper describes a study showing that a very brief intervention improved well-being.